katesullivanjones:

seanhowe:

Above: Stan Lee’s open letter about Steve Ditko’s role in the creation of Spider-Man, 1999.




After Stan Lee reminisced in Comic Book Marketplace about his inspirations for writing an acclaimed late 1965 issue of Amazing Spider-Man, Steve Ditko broke his long silence. “Stan never knew what was in my plotted stories,” the artist wrote to the magazine’s editors, “until I took in the penciled story, the cover, my script and Sol Brodsky took the material from me and took it all into Stan’s office, so I had to leave without seeing or talking to Stan.” A few months later, after Lee was identified in Time as the creator of Spider-Man, Ditko popped up on that magazine’s letters page, too: “Spider-Man’s existence needed a visual concrete entity,” Ditko wrote. “It was a collaboration of writer-editor Stan Lee and Steve Ditko as co-creators.” This time Lee picked up the phone and called Ditko, for the first time in more than thirty years. 





“Steve said, ‘Having an idea is nothing, because until it becomes a physical thing, it’s just an idea,’ ” Lee recalled. “And he said it took him to draw the strip, and to give it life, so to speak, or to make it actually some- thing tangible. Otherwise, all I had was an idea. So I said to him, ‘Well, I think the person who has the idea is the person who creates it. And he said, ‘No, because I drew it.’ Anyway, Steve definitely felt that he was the co-creator of Spider-Man. And that was really, after he said it, I saw it meant a lot to him that was fine with me. So I said fine, I’ll tell everybody you’re the co-creator. That didn’t quite satisfy him. So I sent him a letter.” Text from Marvel Comics: The Untold Story.


ok but can we talk about Stan Lee’s stationery


for your stationery

katesullivanjones:

seanhowe:

Above: Stan Lee’s open letter about Steve Ditko’s role in the creation of Spider-Man, 1999.

After Stan Lee reminisced in Comic Book Marketplace about his inspirations for writing an acclaimed late 1965 issue of Amazing Spider-Man, Steve Ditko broke his long silence. “Stan never knew what was in my plotted stories,” the artist wrote to the magazine’s editors, “until I took in the penciled story, the cover, my script and Sol Brodsky took the material from me and took it all into Stan’s office, so I had to leave without seeing or talking to Stan.” A few months later, after Lee was identified in Time as the creator of Spider-Man, Ditko popped up on that magazine’s letters page, too: “Spider-Man’s existence needed a visual concrete entity,” Ditko wrote. “It was a collaboration of writer-editor Stan Lee and Steve Ditko as co-creators.” This time Lee picked up the phone and called Ditko, for the first time in more than thirty years.

“Steve said, ‘Having an idea is nothing, because until it becomes a physical thing, it’s just an idea,’ ” Lee recalled. “And he said it took him to draw the strip, and to give it life, so to speak, or to make it actually some- thing tangible. Otherwise, all I had was an idea. So I said to him, ‘Well, I think the person who has the idea is the person who creates it. And he said, ‘No, because I drew it.’ Anyway, Steve definitely felt that he was the co-creator of Spider-Man. And that was really, after he said it, I saw it meant a lot to him that was fine with me. So I said fine, I’ll tell everybody you’re the co-creator. That didn’t quite satisfy him. So I sent him a letter.”

Text from Marvel Comics: The Untold Story.

ok but can we talk about Stan Lee’s stationery

done

for your stationery

11 months ago
216 notes
geisterseher:

Jonathan Swift, Gulliver’s voyages to Lilliput and Brobdingnag (1912) Illustrations by P.A. Staynes

geisterseher:

Jonathan Swift, Gulliver’s voyages to Lilliput and Brobdingnag (1912) Illustrations by P.A. Staynes

(via lacriniere)

1 year ago
56 notes
“In November of 1964, fearful of his connection to the Communist Party through Stanley Levison, the FBI anonymously sent Martin Luther King the following threatening letter, along with a cassette that contained allegedly incriminating audio recordings of King with women in various hotel rooms — the fruits of a 9 month surveillance project headed by William C. Sullivan.
Unsurprisingly, King saw the strongly worded letter as an invitation for him to take his own life, as did an official investigation in 1976 which concluded that the letter “clearly implied that suicide would be a suitable course of action for Dr. King.” “

In November of 1964, fearful of his connection to the Communist Party through Stanley Levison, the FBI anonymously sent Martin Luther King the following threatening letter, along with a cassette that contained allegedly incriminating audio recordings of King with women in various hotel rooms — the fruits of a 9 month surveillance project headed by William C. Sullivan.


Unsurprisingly, King saw the strongly worded letter as an invitation for him to take his own life, as did an official investigation in 1976 which concluded that the letter “clearly implied that suicide would be a suitable course of action for Dr. King.” “

1 year ago
0 notes
comicsansarthistory:

Josef Albers, Homage to the Square, 1965

comicsansarthistory:

Josef Albers, Homage to the Square, 1965

1 year ago
172 notes

Dear Various “Seapunk” Hipsters who are Mad at Rihanna and Azealia Banks

omgthatdress:

It really sucks when someone appropriates your style, doesn’t it?

(via katesullivanjones)

1 year ago
336 notes
katesullivanjones:

this book thinks it’s soooo smart 

I have this book too and it offends everyone who has ever looked at my copy.

katesullivanjones:

this book thinks it’s soooo smart 

I have this book too and it offends everyone who has ever looked at my copy.

1 year ago
5 notes
revolutionscummer:

vintagenatgeographic:

Abandoned house keeps company with dairy cattle in Penobscot County, Maine
National Geographic | June 1977

home sweet home, maine

revolutionscummer:

vintagenatgeographic:

Abandoned house keeps company with dairy cattle in Penobscot County, Maine

National Geographic | June 1977

home sweet home, maine

1 year ago
2,132 notes
comicsansarthistory:

Hiroshige Utagawa, Man on Horseback Crossing a Bridge, 1834-1842

comicsansarthistory:

Hiroshige Utagawa, Man on Horseback Crossing a Bridge, 1834-1842

1 year ago
53 notes
pmikos:

Viktor Mikhailovich Vasnetsov, Sirin and Alkonost. The Birds of Joy and SorrowThe State Tretyakov Gallery, MoscowDate: 1896Technique: Oil on canvas, 133 x 250 cmSirin is a mythological creature of Russian legends, with the head and chest of a beautiful woman and the body of a bird (usually an owl). According to the myth, they lived “in Indian lands” near Eden or around the Euphrates River.These half-women half-birds are loosely based on the Greek stories about sirens. They sang beautiful songs to the saints, foretelling future joys. For mortals, however, the birds were dangerous. Men who heard them would forget everything on earth, follow them, and ultimately die. People would attempt to save themselves Sirins by shooting cannons, ringing bells and making other loud noises to scare the bird off.Sometimes Sirin is seen as a metaphor for God’s word going into the soul of a man. Sometimes she is seen as a metaphor of heretics tempting the weak. Sometimes Sirin was considered equivalent to the siren or the Polish Wila. In Russian folklore, Sirin was mixed with the revered religious writer Saint Ephrem the Syrian. Thus, peasant lyrists such as Nikolay Klyuev often used Sirin as a synonym for poet.Famous writer Vladimir Nabokov wrote some of his first novels and poems under the pseudonym Vladimir Sirin.The Alkonost is a legendary bird in Slavic mythology. It has the body of a bird with the head and chest of a woman. The name Alkonost came the name of Greek demi-goddess Alcyone transformed by gods into a kingfisher. The Alkonost reproduces by laying eggs on the sea-shore then putting them into the water. The sea is then calm for six or seven days at which point the eggs hatch, bringing a storm. For the Russian Orthodox Church Alkonost personifies God’s will. She lives in paradise but goes into our world to deliver a message. Her voice is so sweet that anybody hearing it can forget everything. Unlike Sirin, another similar creature, she is not evil.Source 1Source 2

pmikos:

Viktor Mikhailovich Vasnetsov, Sirin and Alkonost. The Birds of Joy and SorrowThe State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow

Date: 1896
Technique: Oil on canvas, 133 x 250 cm

Sirin is a mythological creature of Russian legends, with the head and chest of a beautiful woman and the body of a bird (usually an owl). According to the myth, they lived “in Indian lands” near Eden or around the Euphrates River.

These half-women half-birds are loosely based on the Greek stories about sirens. They sang beautiful songs to the saints, foretelling future joys. For mortals, however, the birds were dangerous. Men who heard them would forget everything on earth, follow them, and ultimately die. People would attempt to save themselves Sirins by shooting cannons, ringing bells and making other loud noises to scare the bird off.

Sometimes Sirin is seen as a metaphor for God’s word going into the soul of a man. Sometimes she is seen as a metaphor of heretics tempting the weak. Sometimes Sirin was considered equivalent to the siren or the Polish Wila. In Russian folklore, Sirin was mixed with the revered religious writer Saint Ephrem the Syrian. Thus, peasant lyrists such as Nikolay Klyuev often used Sirin as a synonym for poet.

Famous writer Vladimir Nabokov wrote some of his first novels and poems under the pseudonym Vladimir Sirin.
The Alkonost is a legendary bird in Slavic mythology. It has the body of a bird with the head and chest of a woman. The name Alkonost came the name of Greek demi-goddess Alcyone transformed by gods into a kingfisher. The Alkonost reproduces by laying eggs on the sea-shore then putting them into the water. The sea is then calm for six or seven days at which point the eggs hatch, bringing a storm. For the Russian Orthodox Church Alkonost personifies God’s will. She lives in paradise but goes into our world to deliver a message. Her voice is so sweet that anybody hearing it can forget everything. Unlike Sirin, another similar creature, she is not evil.

Source 1
Source 2

(via lacriniere)

1 year ago
123 notes